Block Chord And Arpeggio

September 25, 2019

Block Chord And Arpeggio

A Little Info About This Lesson

Would you like to add another ukulele skills to your arsenal? Well today, you’re going to learn how to add block chords and Arpeggios to your ukulele playing.

A block chord uses simple chordal harmony where you have to play the notes of each chord all at the same time. This is quite different compared to playing the chord one at a time (arpeggiated chords). This means all the notes are played simultaneously in one solid “block”.

On the other hand, Arpeggio is played sequentially in ascending or descending order. This technique allows you to pluck the strings one at a time instead of strumming them in a single stroke.

Learn more of these techniques by watching the video below.

Jeffrey's Instructional Video





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